Metaphor/Feelings Cards

Metaphor/Feelings Cards
Item# MetaphorCards
$29.99
Language: 

Product Description

These two sided cards are great for debriefing a group. They have various uses. One side of the card has a metaphoric picture and the other side has a word that describes a feeling.

Metaphor Card uses: Spread the cards out before the group and ask them to choose a card that they can relate their experience with.

Feelings Card uses: Lay the cards out before the group and have them choose a card with a feeling on it that they experienced during the day, program, activity, week, etc.

60 Cards in all, mesh envelope, and directions included.

Here is a testimonial from one of our customers:

"I've been using the metaphor/feelings cards lately and had some really good results with them. They tend to be an effective "icebreaker" when getting to know the members of the group you're working with. I'll have the kids (or adults) pair up after selecting a metaphor card and they will interview each other and ask their partner why they chose the card they did. This might be in the context of what they're feeling that day, the past week, etc. We will then regroup and the interviewer will share what they learned about their partner based on the card their partner selected. This is particularly effective for kids who are hesitant to "open up" or uncomfortable talking in front of a group of people they might not know. The pictures on the cards bring out thoughts and feelings (often in abstract ways) that the kids might not connect with or share on their own. The cards can also represent individual goal setting, what they hope to accomplish that day, etc. They are also an effective closing tool at the end of your program. The feelings cards can be used in similar ways--good to open your program and to go back to at the end of the day to see if certain attitudes and beliefs may have changed as a result of their participation at a ropes course or team building program."

~Skyler Ruggles, Genesee Experiential Outdoor Center, Denver Parks & Recreation

Accessories

Metaphor Cards/Feelings Cards

Type of Activity: Debriefing tool

Props: Metaphor Cards/Feelings Cards

Providing a tangible image upon which participants can attach their thoughts helps give their ideas substance and shape in quite profound depth. Metaphor Cards are useful as introductory activities, for processing a specific experience, for closure, or even as a tool to help participants resolve conflict. Metaphor Card Activities are appealing to participants, can be used in many different ways, and are appropriate for all age groups.

Concept: Groups seem to go more in depth about their ideas and feelings when they attach their thoughts to a symbol or picture. Because participants share about a card rather than directly about themselves they are often more willing to share. Often more reserved members are drawn to expressing themselves through the use of these symbols.

Directions:

As an introductory activity participants can choose the card that best represents a strength they bring to the group, or a goal they have for the day, course or program.

As a pre brief in the early parts of a program spread the cards out before the group and have them pick a card that best represents where they are at that moment. At the very beginning of the day/program, spread the cards out before the group and have them pick a card that best represents where they are at that moment. Ask them how they are feeling and to pick a card that matches where they are mentally coming into the day. Go around the group and ask each participant to share why they picked the card they did and why that card represents them or where they are. If you start the day with this activity, it is good to end the day with this same activity.

Spread the cards out before the group and have them pick a card that best represents an experience or a feeling that they had during the activity or at the end of the day. You can do this at the end of the day or after an activity. Go around the group and ask each participant to share why they picked the card they did and why that card represents them or an experience they have had. Participants can each pick their own card, then draw it or write about in their journal. Group Consensus: The group is given the task of deciding on one card that best represents what they achieved as a group. This is a great method for groups that are ongoing or have been together for a period of time. The outcome can be very rich. The process of deciding on just one card involves participants sharing about their ideas relating to many different cards and making an argument for their interpretation. The dialogue can be very profound with this method.

Social Skills: Another fun way to use the feelings cards are to have everyone pick a card with the picture side up and not look at the feeling word on the back side. Have them place the card to their forehead-word side out-and try to guess what feeling they have on their forehead by everyone else's reaction to them. Participants may say things to each other in order to help them figure out what their word is, but they cannot say the word that is shown. This is a great way to teach verbal social skills, non-verbal social skills, and how people react around others when they are exuding a certain feeling.

Directions:

Here are several examples of Feeling Card activities.

You can use Feelings Cards if a participant is having trouble describing the feelings they are experiencing. Spread the feelings words out and let them pick out a word that best describes what they are feeling. Go around the group and let each person share why they chose the word they did.

You can also use Feelings Cards for a sharing circle. Have each participant choose a card and tell the group about a time when they experienced that feeling.

Use Feelings Cards as a social skills builder. Invite everyone pick a card with the feeling word face down. Have them place the card to their forehead-word side out-and try to guess what feeling they have on their forehead by everyone else's reaction to them. Participants may say things to each other in order to help them figure out what their word is, but they cannot say the word that is shown. This is a great way to teach verbal social skills and non-verbal social skills, and how people react around others when they are in different moods.

Source: Michelle Cummings, Training Wheels, www.training-wheels.com All Rights Reserved. Permission needed to incorporate this handout into any written document.
Metaphor Cards Handout MCHandout