The Chiji Guidebook: A Collection of Experiential Activities and Ideas for Using Chiji Cards, by Chris Cavert and Steve Simpson

The Chiji Guidebook
The Chiji Guidebook
Item# TCG01
$15.99

Product Description

“The Chiji Guidebook is the official companion to the popular facilitation tool, Chiji Cards.”

This book is an instructional guide describing some of the different ways Chiji Cards can be used to facilitate key moments during group experiences. This guidebook gives a simple, straightforward explanation of the processing theory that coincides with the original use of Chiji Cards, and it provides a rationale for when to use one processing technique over another.

The Activity Guide Section of the book presents 25 different ways to use Chiji Cards. The activities are divided into six chapters—Processing Activities, Getting-To-Know-You, Frontloading Activities, Object Lessons, Initiative Activities, and Fun With Chiji Cards. Most of the activities we have developed ourselves, but several come directly from other experiential educators who have shared their uses of the cards with us.

Chiji Cards

What are Chiji Cards? Chiji Cards are a deck of 48 cards with pictures originally designed to spark/enhance discussion during a processing session. When a facilitator asks the group a question, each person chooses a card that symbolizes his or her answer to the question. The images on the cards are used as prompts to help individuals organize their thinking. Rather than having to pull an answer to a question out of thin air, the pictures provide a starting point from which to formulate a response. Chiji Processing Cards were developed by the staff Steven Simpson, Buzz Bocher, & Dan Miller at the Institute for Experiential Education (www.chiji.com) and are available from many experiential education equipment providers.

ISBN: 978-1-885473-84-4

SIZE: 6 x 9

PAGE COUNT: 128

PRICE $15.95

Accessories

Chiji Cards
Chiji is a Chinese word meaning important moment or significant opportunity. Whether this moment leads to a positive or negative path depends upon the actions of the individual. This deck of cards consists of 52 different pictures. Participants are asked to choose different cards as they relate to experiences they have had or can relate to. There are many uses for these cards. Each deck comes with some activity directions.

Some Activity Ideas:

As an introductory activity participants can choose the card that best represents a strength they bring to the group, or a goal they have for the day, course or program.

As a pre brief in the early parts of a program spread the cards out before the group and have them pick a card that best represents where they are at that moment. At the very beginning of the day/program, spread the cards out before the group and have them pick a card that best represents where they are at that moment. Ask them how they are feeling and to pick a card that matches where they are mentally coming into the day. Go around the group and ask each participant to share why they picked the card they did and why that card represents them or where they are. If you start the day with this activity, it is good to end the day with this same activity.

Spread the cards out before the group and have them pick a card that best represents an experience or a feeling that they had during the activity or at the end of the day. You can do this at the end of the day or after an activity. Go around the group and ask each participant to share why they picked the card they did and why that card represents them or an experience they have had. Participants can each pick their own card, then draw it or write about in their journal.

Group Consensus: The group is given the task of deciding on one card that best represents what they achieved as a group. This is a great method for groups that are ongoing or have been together for a period of time. The outcome can be very rich.

The process of deciding on just one card involves participants sharing about their ideas relating to many different cards and making an argument for their interpretation. The dialogue can be very profound with this method.

This works surprisingly well even for classroom sized groups. For very large groups, sub groups could be formed each having their own set of cards or objects. When they come back and share the object they picked it can be interesting to compare and contrast what the other subgroups chose.

Three Card Story A popular way to use the cards is to tell a story of their experience. The group can come to consensus on three or four cards that represent their journey A Powerful closing I learned while co-facilitating involves the group using consensus to pick three objects or cards that tell the story of their progression or “journey” as a group during their training. I ask the group to pick three cards, one that represents "Where we were, one that represents "where we are now" and one to represent "where we are going". This is especially powerful for groups that are going to be working together as a committee, task force, corporation or other long -standing group.

Appreciation Activity: Ask participants to think about the person sitting to their right, pick a card that represents something that they have appreciated about that person during the program.

Activity ideas from the book, A Teachable Moment, by Cain, Cummings and Stanchfield. All rights reserved.
$16.99
Chiji Cards Chiji-Cards